Events

MOOC design patterns 2nd workshop

London Knowledge Lab, 9th July.

Reference sites:

http://www.moocdesign.cde.london.ac.uk/home

http://ilde.upf.edu/moocs/ (Integrated Learning Design Platform)


Objectives:

  • Bring the design patterns generated during the first workshop to beta state;

  • Develop an outline of a MOOC design pattern language;

  • Collect several design scenarios.


Before the workshop:

  • Go to the ILDE at http://ilde.upf.edu/moocs/

  • Review, licence, publish, share with us (Steve and Yishay) your design narratives and patterns from the first workshop;

  • Review and comment on others’ work.


If you were not present at the first workshop:


On the day:


09:30 Coffee & registration;

10:00 Introduction: objectives and methodology;

10:15 Review of 1st workshop outcomes.


11:00 Coffee


11:15 Pattern mapping: paper based, in groups

12:00 Converge: build consensus map using an on-line tool


12:45 Lunch


13:45 Refine patterns using template

14:45 Quick round of presentations

15:00 Design Scenarios with coffee

16:00 Recap and plans ahead


Make a MOOC @ DCU

posted Apr 28, 2016, 8:12 AM by Yishay Mor   [ updated May 5, 2016, 1:39 AM ]

Making MOOCs - Designing for Autonomous and Collaborative Online Learning


A one-day Learning Experience Design workshop for MOOC teams, 

National Institute for Digital Learning, Dublin, May 5th, 2016

Registration here

If you have registered for this event - please take a few minutes to complete the pre-workshop activities


MOOCs (and other forms of open online learning) open up exciting new educational opportunities. Yet, they pose significant challenges for learners, educators, and educational systems. Much of the tacit wisdom we have from traditional small group, face to face teaching needs to be revisited. Consequently, more often than not, we see that the potential of MOOCs remains unrealised.

Much of the potential, as well as the challenge, of MOOCs relates to learners’ autonomy and their ability to collaborate with other learners. One the one hand, MOOCs afford the freedom for learners to define their own learning path, and adjust it to their personal circumstances. On the other hand, this freedom requires learners to engage at a meta-level with the course experience, as active partners rather than as consumers of a pre-packaged product. One one hand, a MOOC offers learners the opportunity to interact and co-construct knowledge with hundreds, thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of fellow learners who share their interests and passions. On the other hands, these communities are short-lived and unstable, and their scale is beyond our social capacity - defying what we know about the natural dynamics of social learning.

This workshop will be based on the Learning Design Studio methodology and draw on the outputs of the SCORE2020 project and MOOC design patterns to lead participants through a collaborative process of design inquiry of learning. In this process, we will refine our understanding of our target learners and their learning contexts, identify specific educational challenges within these contexts, review relevant knowledge and existing solutions to similar challenges, and conceptualise an validate our own solutions. We will use the integrated learning design environment (ILDE - ilde.upf.edu/moocs/) to support this process.


At the end of the day, you will take home a set of design artefacts (personas, transition matrices, storyboards, wireframes, etc.) which you will be able to use in developing your MOOCs. You will also take with you a design methodology you can use with your team, and the tools to support it.

Specific objectives

In this workshop you will:
  • Identify your learners’ needs, assets and constraints;
  • Articulate the aims and objectives of the course for you and for your learners.
  • Consider the appropriate pedagogical approaches, the effective educational practices, and the suitable technologies to support them – for achieving the aims you defined in the situation you described, with an emphasis on autonomous and collaborative learning;
  • Storyboard a high-level design for your course, along with models of activity flows and specific exemplar activities;
  • Validate your design through guided self and peer review.
  • Develop tools and methods for evaluating the success of your course and learning innovation.

Make A MOOC @ DCU

Agenda

09:30 Introduction to SCORE2020
09:50 Personas and Transition Matrices
10:30 Factors and Concerns
11:00 Coffee break
11:20 Design Principles
11:50 Design Patterns
12:20 Design Scheme
12:40 Discussion
13:00 Lunch
14:00 What Works and Why?
14:10 Storyboards
14:45 Self review
15:00 Peer review
15:30 Discussion
16:00 End

6th Workshop - Design a MOOC in a SNaP! at EC TEL 2015

posted May 20, 2015, 3:22 AM by Yishay Mor   [ updated Jul 14, 2015, 3:37 AM by Steven Warburton ]

Toledo, 15 Sept. 2015
This is the sixth workshop in the MOOC design patterns project series, conducted in collaboration with MOOCs & co.
 
It will be held as a one day pre-conference event at EC TEL 2015.

The workshop is free for EC-TEL attendees, and is open to others for a modest fee. Please see the EC-TEL registration page for details. We will be handing out MOOC design kits to registered participants, so please register here:

Places are limited! Please
register to ensure you participation (link to EventBrite)!

This workshop will guide participants in the process of designing a MOOC using Design Scenarios, Narratives and Patterns (SNaP). The workshop uses an enhanced version of the Learning Design Studio methodology, which was originally conceived by one of the authors as a format for teacher training and has since been developed as a framework for blended an online courses, and professional development workshops. This methodology has been further developed by the Metis project (http://metis-project.org/), which has also developed the ILDE as a platform to support it (http://ilde.upf.edu/). The workshop will use the ILDE as a workbench, and utilize the resources developed by the 'MOOC Design Patterns' project (http://www.moocdesign.cde.london.ac.uk/).

Introduction

This workshop will guide educators through the process of scoping, conceptualising and developing a MOOC. It is intended both for practitioners who are making their first steps in online education and for experienced MOOC providers who want to take a step back, reflect on and improve their practice. The workshop will help practitioners navigate the challenges they face when embarking on the educational venture of creating a MOOC; defining the educational need and the appropriate means for addressing it, identifying a viable business model, and curating the appropriate technologies and resources.

The workshop promotes a learning design mindset - encouraging educators to focus on the change they wish to instigate, rather than the content they need to deliver. It builds on the methodology and tools developed by Metis - a European Life-long learning project which brought together some of the leaders in the field of learning design in Europe, to promote a design approach to educational practice in a variety of sectors (HE, FE, Vocational). It makes extensive use of the University of London’s MOOC Design Patterns project, which brought together a variety of MOOC design experts and guided them in articulating, sharing, scrutinizing and refining their knowledge. This knowledge will now be made available to workshop participants in an accessible and applicable form.

The workshop will be based on the Learning Design Studio format and its manifestation in Metis learning design cycle (http://metis-project.org/resources/METISlifecycle.pdf) and the Metis learning design workshop methodology, activities and resources (http://metis-project.org/resources/deliverables/METIS_D3-3.pdf). A variant of this methodology, known as the Learning Design Studio (http://www.yishaymor.org/lds) was used in the past as the basis for the Open Learning Design Studio MOOC (http://www.olds.ac.uk/) and the HandsonICT MOOCs for teacher professional development (http://handsonict.eu/).

This is an active, collaborative, project-based workshop. Participants will work on the design of a MOOC (or other educational experience) which they define, in their area of expertise. They will define the objectives of their MOOC and the evaluation criteria for its success. They will then describe their learners and the context in which they operate. Next, they will consider examples of educational practices which they find inspiring. Based on the outcomes of this inquiry, they will conceptualise and prototype their own MOOC. Finally, they will evaluate this design and reflect on the process.

Schedule:

1. Your MOOC - promises and challenges

We will share dreams and form groups of common interest:
  • Why do you want to run a MOOC? 
  • What are the assets that will help you succeed? 
  • What are the barriers that can make you fail? 

2. Setting the pieces

A course is a journey that takes learners from where they are to where they want to go, and where the course leader wants to take them. Before you dive into designing the flow of activities and the content to support them, you need to understand who are your learners, where are they coming from, and where do you and they want to take them.

3. "How to ruin my MOOC"

Identify the biggest risks to your MOOC, and the forces that will realise, amplify or block these.

4. Design is re-design

Surely, someone has solved this puzzle before, or at least a similar one. Look at examples of past practice, and at the design patterns derived from these, and see what you can modify and re-use.

5. Draft a scenario using these patterns and principles

Construct a quick outline solution strategy, which would address the key issues you have identified.

6. Review your peers’ scenarios

Use rubrics and evaluation matrices to offer your peers feedback on their work.

7. Storyboard

Represent the MOOC, or part of it, in a graphical mode which is accessible and conducive to discussion.

8. Reflect and plan ahead

Review your work and its outcomes, and devise a plan for the near future.

References

Bergin, J., Eckstein, J., Volter, M., Sipos, M., Wallingford, E., Marquardt, K., Chandler, J., Sharp, H.,, Manns, M. L. (2012). Pedagogical Patterns: Advice For Educators. Jose Bergin Software Tools. 

Conole, G., McAndrew, P. & Dimitriadis, Y. (2010). The role of CSCL pedagogical patterns as mediating artefacts for repurposing Open Educational Resources. In F. Pozzi & D. Persico (ed.) Techniques for Fostering Collaboration in Online Learning Communities: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives (pp. 206-223) . Hershey: New York.

Hernández-Leo, D., Chacón, J., Prieto, J. P., Asensio-Pérez, J. I. & Derntl, M. (2013). Towards an Integrated Learning Design Environment. Proceedings of 8th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 2013, LNCS 8095 (p./pp. 448–453),

Hernández-Leo, D., Asensio-Pérez, J. I., Derntl, M., Prieto, L. P. & Chacón, J. (2014). ILDE: Community Environment for Conceptualizing, Authoring and Deploying Learning Activities. Proceedings of 9th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2014, Graz, Austria, September 2014 (p./pp. 490-493)

Warburton, S. & Mor, Y. (2015). Double Loop Design: Configuring Narratives, Patterns and Scenarios in the Design of Technology Enhanced Learning. In Y. Mor, M. Maina & B. Craft (ed.), The Art and Science of Learning Design. Sense publishers

Mor, Y., Craft, B. & Hernández-Leo, D. (2013). Editorial: The art and science of learning design. Research in Learning Technology, 21

Mor, Y. & Mogilevsky, O. (2013). The Learning Design Studio: Collaborative Design Inquiry as Teachers' Professional Development. Research in Learning Technology, 21. 

Mor, Y. (2013). SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using Scenarios, Narratives and Patterns. In R. Luckin, P. Goodyear, B. Grabowski, S. Puntambekar, N. Winters & J. Underwood (ed.), Handbook of Design in Educational Technology (pp. 189-200) Routledge.

Mor, Y., Warburton, S. & Winters, N. (2012). Participatory Pattern Workshops: A Methodology for Open Learning Design Inquiry. Research in Learning Technology, 20. 

Sharp, H., Manns, M. L. & Eckstein, J. (2003). Evolving Pedagogical Patterns: The Work of the Pedagogical Patterns Project. Computer Science Education, 13, 315-330. 

 Voogt, J., Laferrière, T., Breuleux, A., Itow, R., Hickey, D. & McKenney, S. (2015). Collaborative design as a form of professional development. Instructional Science, , 1-24. doi: 10.1007/s11251-014-9340-7 

Warburton, S. & Mor, Y. (2015). Double Loop Design: Configuring Narratives, Patterns and Scenarios in the Design of Technology Enhanced Learning. In Y. Mor, M. Maina & B. Craft (ed.), The Art and Science of Learning Design. Sense publishers. Wenger, E., Trayner, B. & de Laat, M. (2011). Promoting and assessing value creation in communities and networks: A conceptual framework. The Netherlands: Ruud de Moor Centrum

5th Workshop at eMOOC conference 18/05/15

posted Feb 18, 2015, 10:29 AM by Steven Warburton   [ updated Feb 18, 2015, 10:30 AM ]

The fifth workshop in the MOOC Design Patterns project will be held at the eMOOC conference on 18/05/15. Full details of the session are available here.

RIDE 2015 - design pattern session

posted Feb 3, 2015, 9:30 AM by Steven Warburton   [ updated Feb 3, 2015, 9:33 AM ]

Rapid workshop session announced for the Centre for Distance Education RIDE conference on Friday 6th February 2015. A chance for participants to explore the MOOC design patterns. More information on the programme here.

3rd Workshop: MOOC Design - a Writers' Workshop

posted Sep 13, 2014, 8:33 AM by Yishay Mor   [ updated Feb 7, 2015, 4:14 AM by Steven Warburton ]

Rescheduled to: Friday, 16th January 2015, London Knowledge Lab

As the MOOC hype settles, and we start climbing "the slope of enlightenment", a body of knowledge is shaping on how to design MOOCs for effective and efficient teaching and learning experiences. The aim of the MOOC design project is to begin consolidating this knowledge into a semi-structured coherent and robust design language. 
Our previous workshops brought together a variety of MOOC designers, facilitators and participants, and engaged them in a process of collaborative reflection - which led to the articulation of their insights in a set of design narratives and design patterns. The aim of this workshop is to refine those narratives and patterns, and bring them to publishable form. To this end, we will follow a modified version of the writers' workshop model. As the Hillside site notes

The writers workshop format is a particularly effective method to review, evaluate, and improve pattern descriptions. The general structure of a writers workshop has a group of "discussants'' read the paper carefully before the session. During the workshop the discussants examine the strengths and weaknesses of each paper, accentuating positive aspects and suggesting improvements in content and style.

At the end of the workshop, we will consider a range of publication options. While we expect most of the contributions to come from the participants of previous workshops, we are open to new contributions - as long as these address the themes of the project and follow the form and structure below.

Dates and Submission

DeadlineMonday, 5th January 2015
Notification:  Within one week of submission (submit earlier - and you will be notified earlier)
ShepherdingFrom notification until the workshop date
Workshop: 16th January 2015 
Please submit your papers via: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=moocdp03
Please register via email to: s.warburton[AT]surrey.ac.uk

Submission guidelines

Length  4000-8000 words
Structure Papers should include
  • Title
  • Authors names and affiliations
  • Licence copyright / creative commons (preferred)
  • Abstract 150 words
  • Introduction problem statement, theoretical framework, review of the relevant literature
  • 1-3 Design Narratives a brief summary of the narratives, and a link to the detailed version on ILDE.
  • 1-3 Design Patterns  a brief summary of the narratives, and a link to the detailed version on ILDE.
  • Discussion
  • References
Format: Word, pdf, or OpenOffice documents. We do not have a template or a style guide. Please use APA or Harvard for references.
We do not provide a template or require a strict style, but if you want to get a sense of what a pattern paper looks like you can browse through the proceedings of the EuroPLoP conferences, which provide examples of "classical" pattern papers and the the Practical Design Patterns book (the first 60 pages are available as a free download).

Chairs
Steven Warburton, Patricia Charlton, Yishay Mor

Shepherds / Programme Committee
Yishay Mor
Steven Warburton
Stylianos Hatzipanagos
Christian Kohls
Christian Köppe

References and links

Bayne, S. & Ross, J. (2014), 'The pedagogy of the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): the UK view' , Technical report, Higher Education Academy .

Bentley, P.; Crump, H.; Cuffe, P.; Gniadek, I.; Jamieson, B.; MacNeill, S. & Mor, Y. (2014), Signals of Success and Self-directed Learningin Ulrike Cress & Carlos Delgado Kloos, ed., 'Proceedings of the European MOOC Stakeholder Summit 2014' , pp. 18-25 .

Coplien, J. O. (1997), A pattern language for writers' workshopsin 'Proceedings of the 2nd European Conference on Pattern Languages of Programming (EuroPLoP '97). Siemens Technical Report 120/SW1/FB', Siemens, Munich, Germany, pp. 51-60.

Ferguson, R. & Sharples, M. (2014), Innovative Pedagogy at Massive Scale: Teaching and Learning in MOOCs In: 9th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2014): Open Learning and Teaching in Educational Communities , 16-19 September 2014, Graz, Austria (Forthcoming), Springer International Publishing, pp. 98–111.

Gabriel, R. P. (2007), 'Writers' Workshops As Scientific Methodology'.

Gabriel, R. P. (2002), Writer's Workshops and the Work of Making Things, Addison-Wesley Longman Publishing Co., Inc. Boston, MA, USA

Liyanagunawardena, T. R.; Adams, A. A. & Williams, S. A. (2013), 'MOOCs: A systematic study of the published literature 2008-2012', The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning14 (3) , 202-227 .

Mor, Y. & Warburton, S. (2014), Assessing the value of design narratives, patterns and scenarios in scaffolding co-design processes in the domain of technology enhanced learningin Sian Bayne; Chris Jones; Maarten de Laat; Thomas Ryberg & Christine Sinclair, ed., 'Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Networked Learning 2014'.

Mor, Y.; Mellar, H.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N., ed. (2014), Practical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology , Sense , Rotterdam/Boston/Taipei .

Mor, Y. (2013), SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using Scenarios, Narratives and Patternsin Rosemary Luckin; Peter Goodyear; Barbara Grabowski; Sadhana Puntambekar; Niall Winters & Joshua Underwood, ed., 'Handbook of Design in Educational Technology' , Routledge, , pp. 189-200 .

Mor, Y.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N. (2012), 'Participatory Pattern Workshops: A Methodology for Open Learning Design Inquiry', Research in Learning Technology 20.

2nd workshop: Wednesday, 9 July 2014, London Knowledge Lab

posted Jun 26, 2014, 2:59 AM by Yishay Mor   [ updated Jun 26, 2014, 3:11 AM by Yishay Mor ]


This is the 2nd workshop of the CDE MOOC Design project. This project aims to explore, define and articulate the emerging design principles and patterns that underpin the development and delivery of massive open online courses (MOOCs), and to demonstrate them by application to the design of new MOOCs or elements of MOOCs. The project will achieve this by bringing together the diverse but complimentary perspectives that will include designers, deliverers, researchers, learners and tutors who are engaged in MOOCS and Open and Distance Learning more broadly.

To facilitate the effective exchange of design knowledge within this community, we will utilise the SNaP! methodolgy, and the Participatory Pattern Workshop format (see below). At our 1st workshop, we collected MOOC design narratives, and from these we derived MOOC design patterns. Now, we will use these to constuct design scenarios for future MOOCs.

Visit our google+ page for an open discussion about this event.

Mor, Y.; Mellar, H.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N., ed. (2014), Practical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology , Sense , Rotterdam/Boston/Taipei .

Mor, Y. (2013), SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using Scenarios, Narratives and Patterns, in Rosemary Luckin; Peter Goodyear; Barbara Grabowski; Sadhana Puntambekar; Niall Winters & Joshua Underwood, ed., 'Handbook of Design in Educational Technology' , Routledge, , pp. 189-200

Mor, Y.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N. (2012), 'Participatory Pattern Workshops: A Methodology for Open Learning Design Inquiry', Research in Learning Technology 20.

1st workshop: 27 May 2014, London Knowledge Lab

posted Apr 3, 2014, 6:48 AM by Yishay Mor   [ updated Apr 8, 2014, 3:22 PM ]

This is the 1st workshop of the CDE MOOC Design project. This project aims to explore, define and articulate the emerging design principles and patterns that underpin the development and delivery of massive open online courses (MOOCs), and to demonstrate them by application to the design of new MOOCs or elements of MOOCs.

We will do this by bringing together the diverse but complimentary perspectives that will include designers, deliverers, researchers, learners and tutors who are engaged in MOOCS and Open and Distance Learning more broadly.

To facilitate the effective exchange of design knowledge within this community, we will utilise the SNaP! methodolgy, and the Participatory Pattern Workshop format (see below). Prior to this workshop, we will collect design narratives of MOOC participants, facilitators, developers and stakeholders. At the workshop we will review these narratives and extract recurring patterns of challenges and the possible methods of their resolution.

Register for the workshop at: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/untangling-mooc-designs-from-narratives-to-patterns-tickets-11170867365

Visit our google+ page for an open discussion about this event.

Please register at http://ilde.upf.edu/moocs/ and share your design narratives of MOOCs you have taken part in as a designer, developer, facilitator, learner or in any other role.

Mor, Y.; Mellar, H.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N., ed. (2014), Practical Design Patterns for Teaching and Learning with Technology , Sense , Rotterdam/Boston/Taipei .

Mor, Y. (2013), SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using Scenarios, Narratives and Patternsin Rosemary Luckin; Peter Goodyear; Barbara Grabowski; Sadhana Puntambekar; Niall Winters & Joshua Underwood, ed., 'Handbook of Design in Educational Technology' , Routledge, , pp. 189-200

Mor, Y.; Warburton, S. & Winters, N. (2012), 'Participatory Pattern Workshops: A Methodology for Open Learning Design Inquiry', Research in Learning Technology 20.

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